Tag: global

Panel Discussion: Doing Business in India

Our Country Manager in India, Daniel Ben-Ezra, participated in a panel discussion recently at the Dutch Ambassador’s residence in Delhi.

Daniel represented Pro QC and discussed conducting business in India, including the cultural differences between the Netherlands and India.

The panel discussion took place in front of a delegation of business people from the Netherlands. As the World Bank notes, India has increased in the ranks for a number of key economic indicators, including starting a business. The current leadership of India is implementing sweeping changes to encourage international business in India, from privatization to the liberalization of trade.

A few resources related to doing business with India include:

 

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(Daniel Ben-Ezra is the gentleman to the left of the man standing. The Dutch Ambassador, Mr. Alphonsus Stoelinga, is the 2nd person to the from the person standing.)

Language translation challenges for businesses

Business News Daily captured our attention this morning with a post discussing things you should know about language translation. As an organization that does offer translation services for documents such as product specifications, instruction manuals or CAD drawings, we also recognize the challenges from an internal perspective as well.  From internal documentation of processes and procedures to global marketing, offering services in over thirty countries means multiple languages must be available.  Their accuracy is salient.

As the article notes…

A good translation can make a huge difference in how content is received.” Ian Henderson, chief technology officer and chairman of global language service provider Rubric, noted that a low-quality translation can give a bad impression of your business.

The article also suggests a business has three options for language translation: machine translation, a professional translator or crowdsourcing. Each one has its costs and benefits, and each serves a specific purpose.

Machine translation tools, such as Google Translate,are usually free to use and give you an instant translation when you copy and paste text into it. Keep in mind that these tools only provide basic translations and are often not completely accurate.

Professional translators are native or fluent speakers who will provide a high-quality translation of your content for a fee. Unlike machine translators, a professional can take grammar rules and colloquial phrases into account to make the content flow more naturally.

Crowdsourced translation may take some time to complete because you’re dealing with volunteers who likely have little translation experience. However, crowdsourcing is less expensive than hiring a professional translator and still provides a comparable quality of translation.

When determining how to proceed with a translation project, consider the resources available, time requirements and overall importance of the project.  Also, consider the expertise of the translator when using a professional. While an individual may be well versed in a language, there is often industry-specific information that may be more challenging to localize.

Learn more about Pro QC’s translation services here.  Read the original Business News Daily article here.

 

 

Best Practices For Minimizing Global Supplier Risk

We were just reading through an article posted by Supply Chain Management Review that discusses Four Best Practices for Minimizing Global Supplier Risk.  As a third-party quality engineering and consulting firm, we get questions about this often and have written a handful of articles related to the topic.

We like the SCMR’s four best practices, but did want to add some additional comments.

1) Make routine site visits.

It can be quite costly to manage routine site visits, whether your supplier is domestic or abroad.  All of the benefits discussed in the article can be achieved by partnering with a third-party to represent your interests on-site.  From facility audits to product inspections, a third-party has more local knowledge and specific experience in supplier development.

“Site visits allow procurement officers to ensure that workplace practices and product quality are consistent with their expectations, as well as to increase the likelihood of early discovery of major problems—from supply chain hiccups to unsafe working conditions.”

2) Invest in local advisors.

Local advisors can be the third-party QC organization or agent if one is being used, but a solid relationship with suppliers isn’t an impossible achievement either.  Open communication goes a long way here.  Third-party quality providers (3PQs) are unbiased and can offer extensive local expertise. Many third-parties are actually perceived as extensions of an organization’s own in-house quality representatives.

“Investing in consultants or other advisors on the ground in the countries where your risk is greatest, who understand the dynamics relevant to your business and can flag problems early, is critical to maintaining a smooth foreign procurement experience.

3) Reward supplier performance.

Supplier development is more than a reward system for supplier performance.  When organizations work with suppliers to develop partnerships, evaluation and corrective action is seen as more of a continuous improvement effort rather than a grading and/or carrot-stick system.  When weighing risk vs. reward, many suppliers that feel they are in a partnership are thinking long-term.

Rewarding supplier performance is good though.

“Getting out in front of potential disasters with a program that benefits suppliers for avoiding or mitigating risk is one of the best investments a procurement department can make in protecting the procurement function and the company.”

4) Build internal support.

Pick up any quality book, and it’s going to mention the necessity of top-down support.  Communications become especially relevant here. Make sure you’re capturing the right data and using it to communicate effectively to whoever your audience is.

Getting buy-in from the top corporate brass, as well as from senior executive peers in other departments, can be critical to securing the resources necessary for a robust and effective risk-management program. 

Also check out our recent post on 3 Ways to Improve Supplier Communications.  Pro QC’s VP/Americas also contributed a newsletter article regarding Reducing Outsourcing Risks and Cost.  Read this one to learn more about the third-party quality provider (3PQ) value.

Global Manufacturing: Current Reality & Emerging Trends

Companies sourcing from China and greater Asia have enjoyed relatively stable conditions for nearly 20 years. Unfortunately, conditions affecting raw materials, labor, logistics, quality, regulations and currency translations are now changing rapidly and inducing disruptions in supply chain structures across the region while also creating new opportunities in other countries.

In Michael L. Hetzel’s most recent seminar, we review the current reality of manufacturing in China, Greater Asia, The Americas and Europe along with the present and expected trends emerging throughout the world. Michael, Pro QC’s VP/Americas, provides information that will enable you to enhance your understanding of the present conditions and emerging trends in order to create and maintain effective manufacturing strategies, minimize total costs and anticipate potential supply chain disruptions that can lead to delivery delays, increased warranty costs and product recalls.

GlobalBusinessProfessor.com has posted this content to their website with unlimited access.  View the complete seminar here.