Tag: proqc

Global Manufacturing: Current Reality & Emerging Trends

Companies sourcing from China and greater Asia have enjoyed relatively stable conditions for nearly 20 years. Unfortunately, conditions affecting raw materials, labor, logistics, quality, regulations and currency translations are now changing rapidly and inducing disruptions in supply chain structures across the region while also creating new opportunities in other countries.

In Michael L. Hetzel’s most recent seminar, we review the current reality of manufacturing in China, Greater Asia, The Americas and Europe along with the present and expected trends emerging throughout the world. Michael, Pro QC’s VP/Americas, provides information that will enable you to enhance your understanding of the present conditions and emerging trends in order to create and maintain effective manufacturing strategies, minimize total costs and anticipate potential supply chain disruptions that can lead to delivery delays, increased warranty costs and product recalls.

GlobalBusinessProfessor.com has posted this content to their website with unlimited access.  View the complete seminar here.

Evaluating inspection reports

Many companies anxiously await product quality inspection results and focus on the “accept” or “reject” status alone.  However, it is important to note that useful information exists within the details that are worth examining.  Here are a few things that should be considered:

Defect Trends – An accepted inspection doesn’t mean that no defects were noted.  It just means they fell within the AQL (Acceptable Quality Limit).  Maintaining a spreadsheet of defect data can help identify trends and areas of improvement.  Using the idea of 80/20 (Pareto), continuous improvement efforts can be targeted at defects contributing 20% of the total, with the expectation that an 80% overall improvement will result.

Packaging Variance – If packaging details are not provided in the product specification, the inspector will report the findings and use the package integrity testing (ISTA drop-test) to determine if there are any issues.  However, it is useful to note variations in packaging when they exist.  Digital photos and metric information is included within the reports.

Product Specification Revision – As inspection reports are issued and findings evaluated, changes to the product specification should be made as a continuous improvement effort.

For additional information regarding understanding the inspection process, click here.

 

Quality Quotes – Our Newsletter Collection (2007-2012)

Quality quotes are a popular topic, as we’ve seen in the ASQ LinkedIn Group and in feedback regarding our blog and newsletter.  As we issue quarterly newsletters, we include a “Quote of the Quarter.”  Here’s our comprehensive list of quotes, as noted in our newsletters going back to 2007.

“Customers are the most important assets any company has, even though they don’t show up on the balance sheet.” (Berry)
“The ideas of control and improvement are often confused with one another. That is because quality control and quality improvement are inseparable.” (Ishihara)
“Quality is not what happens when what you do matches your intentions. It is what happens when what you do matches your customers’ expectations.” (Guaspari)
“Good quality is never achieved by accident.” (Ishihara)
“Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
“Higher quality costs less, not more.” (Scherkenbach)
“Total quality management is a journey, not a destination.” (Berry)
“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” (Peter Drucker)
“Consumers, by seeking quality and value, set the standards of acceptability for products and services by voting with their marketplace dollars.” (Ronald Reagan)
 “You must persevere to accomplish seemingly impossible tasks.” (Chinese Proverb)
“Quality is not an act, it is a habit.” (Aristotle)
“The starting point for improvement is to recognize the need.”   (Imai)
“Be a yardstick of quality. Some people are not used to working in an environment where excellence is expected.”
(Steve Jobs)
“Anything worth doing is worth doing right the first time.”  (Unknown)
“The quality of our expectations determines the quality of our action.”  (Andre Godin)
“Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is much better than two doubles.”  (Steve Jobs)
“Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives.”  (William A. Foster)
 “It is our choices that show who we really are, far more than our abilities.”  (JK Rawling)

 

Can jet lag be avoided?

Attracting the attention of Pro QC’s Managing Director, Ed Sanchez, was an article relating to avoiding jet lag.  As a frequent flyer visiting our offices in over thirty countries, it is understandable why!  Also, many of our clients are well aware of jet lag too, frequently visiting factories or operations abroad.

Jet lag (AKA desynchronosis) is described as “extreme tiredness and other physical effects felt by a person after a long flight across several time zones.”  While not everyone suffers from jet lag, it can certainly make travel unpleasant for others.  Interestingly, “the condition is not linked to the length of flight, but to the trans-meridian (west–east) distance traveled. A ten-hour flight from Europe to southern Africa does not cause jet lag, as travel is primarily north–south. A five-hour flight from the east to the west coast of the United States may well result in jet lag.” (Source)

The article forwarded to me by Mr. Sanzhez was interesting.  The recommendations of the blogger, Chris Kilham, a frequent traveler himself, are sound:

  • Start out rested.
  • Get regular exercise.
  • Drink plain water.
  • Drink little or no alcohol.
  • Meditate on flights for at least a few minutes.

In addition, Kilham offers supplement suggestions that include melatonin and ginseng.

The travel editor for TODAY, Peter Greenberg, added the importance of restricting food on the flight.

Molly Ogorzaly, with Travelsmart, offers twelve steps to avoid jet lag.  Suggestions include the importance of moving to avoid DVT and setting your clock to the destination time at the beginning of the flight.

Reaching out to a couple of Pro QC’s key team members that travel often, they shared the following advice:

“Just go through the day.  No matter when you arrive, hold on and sleep with everyone else.  I also believe that frequent overseas travelers can adjust faster than non-frequent overseas travelers.” ~Fernando Rodriguez, Account Manager

“My remedy to jet lag is more or less the same as the one described by Fernando. I usually try to sleep as much as I can on the plane and I immediately adjust to whatever time it is at destination. If I arrive in the early morning spend the whole day without sleeping and if I arrive at night I go to bed at the time I would go to bed back home. In any case, it is best not to sleep before 11:00 pm. I have had the experience to fall asleep around 4:00pm~5:00pm but that has resulted in me being jet lagged for the next 5 days or so and waking up in the middle of the night within able to fall asleep again. Also, as soon as I arrive I follow the local breakfast/lunch dinner pattern. This helps the body adjust faster.” ~Bruno Singier, Sales & Marketing Director (Europe, Middle-East & Asia)

“I do several things to minimize jet lag, including trying to adjust my schedule at least a week in advance, eat and sleep on the destination schedule en route and minimize alcohol consumption.” ~Michael L. Hetzel, VP/Americas

Top 5 – Quality Resources that Educate & Inspire

We’ve given some thought to quality resources we find particularly useful and that both educate and inspire…  Here are our top five:

American Society for Quality > Quality Tools

  • ASQ offers comprehensive content relating to various quality tools, conveniently organized by function.  You’ll find everything from histograms to stratification.  Regularly browsing through the tools is a great way to get inspiration for data analysis or better understand an existing collection.  The Knowledge Center is invaluable!

Chartered Quality Institute > Knowledge Hub

Lean Enterprise Institute > Webinars

  • LEI’s website offers a great deal of content relating to all things lean… They proclaim to try and answer the simple question of every manager, which is “What can I do on Monday morning to make a difference in my organization?”

Khan Academy 

  • This site has an amazing collection of videos… over 3000 in fact! While topics range from science to humanities, the math videos relating to statistics and probability are particularly helpful for those in the quality industry.

The Quality Toolbox

  • This is the one quality book you can’t do without.  It’s everything you need… and more.

And, we’ll add one extra invaluable resource to the mix…

Pro QC International > Quality Resources

  • We’ve tried to organize  resources accessible directly from our site.  We’ve incorporated quality terms, sampling and defect classification information and more. We are also working on a collection of educational videos addressing the most common questions we receive.