Tag: quality

Too much quality?

Wichita’s NPR station recently focused an OnWords piece related to quality.

Consider the following:

“You can usually tell that an organization has stopped caring about quality when it becomes the only thing they talk about.”

As quality professionals, we revel in the fact that organizations might be talking too much about quality. In that scenario, we have won and finally impressed the message that quality is indeed everyone’s responsibility.

And, is there really such a thing as too much data? Of course we know there is, but most quality engineers are going to revert to Deming:

“In god we trust, all others bring data.” 

The last comment in this piece is compelling though:

“So if it seems like a quality improvement plan has pulled all the passion out of your product, perhaps you should go back and ask what quality means for the product you sell.”

This is noted as consistent with the Plan > Do > Check < Act (PDCA) cycle and sums up the nature of continuous improvement nicely.

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement and success have no meaning.” ~Benjamin Franklin

 

Quality as a Journey: Keep Going & Other Lessons Learned

Some of our inquiries at Pro QC come from organizations reaching out for reactive assistance that addresses current, significant quality issues. Once the immediate issue is addressed, ongoing quality efforts lose their luster until the next debacle.  It can be a viscous cycle in which clients are faced with difficult decisions regarding accountability to stakeholders.  Reactive solutions are also often more costly.

But, quality is a journey.

It’s a journey.

Here are a few lessons learned as an organization offering over three decades of experience in the industry:

  1. A successful journey starts and ends with the right leadership.  The organization’s leadership must support quality and ongoing efforts for improvements. And, that support must be communicated from the top, down in order for everyone to understand the importance of quality as a factor in decision making.

Focus on Quality: Resources & Recommendations for World Quality Month

Inc. posted an article a few weeks ago that identified tips for becoming a billionaire.  And, it’s no surprise to us that each recommendation is either directly or indirectly related to quality.

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The following were cited as “insider success secrets:”

  • Live well below your means.
  • Focus on quality above everything.
  • Think about sustainability.
  • Constantly seek out people smarter than you.
  • Learn how to lead different personalities
  • Be a flexible planner.
  • Being understood is overrated.

The article is timely… Each November, World Quality Month is observed. And, quality professionals throughout the global community participate in spreading the word.

Support Manufacturing Education & Awareness on October 7th

“Manufacturing is more than just putting parts together. It’s coming up with ideas, testing principles and perfecting the engineering, as well as final assembly.” ~James Dyson

We post this quote predictably each year as Manufacturing Day approaches.  This year, Manufacturing Day will be observed on October 7th.

What is Manufacturing Day? 

“Manufacturing Day℠ is a celebration of modern manufacturing meant to inspire the next generation of manufacturers.”

Why is it important?

Research reveals the theory behind Manufacturing Day works. For the first time, participants were polled about their experience. A new Deloitte perception survey developed in collaboration with The Manufacturing Institute was distributed to the more than 2,500 manufacturing hosts to gather data from attendees. The results are dramatic:

Confirmed: Perceived Quality Affects Customer Advocacy More Than Any Other Element

The September issue of Harvard Business Review  includes an article related to The Elements of Value. In the article, a study highlights what customers value in products varies by industry.

1472758161An included table summarizes the top 10 elements of value that various industries find influence loyalty. (Left)

The 10 types of businesses evaluated include:

Apparel/Retail
TV Service Providers
Discount Retail
Consumer Banking
Grocery
Brokerage
Food and Beverages
Auto Insurance
Smartphones
Credit Cards

 

See anything in common? For all industries noted, “Quality” is referenced at the top of the list.

“Some elements do matter more than others. Across all industries studied, perceived quality affects customer advocacy more than any other element. Products and services must attain a certain minimum level, and no other elements can make up for a significant shortfall on this one.”

“A rigorous model of consumer value allows a company to come up with new combinations of value that its products and services could deliver. The right combinations, pays off in stronger customer loyalty, greater customer willingness to try a particular brand, and sustained revenue growth.”