Tag: testing

National Safety Month – Learn & Share

oc1313-world-safety-day-infographicv3Observed ​annually in June, National Safety Month focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road and in our homes and communities.

According to the International Labor Organization,

Every 15 seconds, a worker dies from a work-related accident or disease.

Every 15 seconds, 153 workers have a work-related accident.

An estimated 2.3 million people die every year from work-related accidents and diseases. More than 160 million people suffer from occupational and work-related diseases, and there are 313 million non-fatal accidents per year. The suffering caused by such accidents and illnesses to workers and their families is incalculable. In economic terms, the ILO has estimated that more than 4% of the world’s annual GDP is lost as a consequence of occupational accidents and diseases.

How safe would we be without standards?

Five Ways to Ensure Quality Manufacturing – Sourcing Success

Whether you’re sourcing abroad, or from a manufacturer down the street, similar issues with product quality, shipment delays, cost and safety concerns, etc. still apply.  To mitigate the quality risks and cost involved in sourcing, we recommend five actions that have been proven successful throughout the three decades of experience we have working with clients and suppliers around the world.

1 – Audit Potential & Existing Suppliers 

To help ensure that potential or existing suppliers deliver high-quality products, operate efficiently, and support continuous improvement, process surveys and factory audits are performed.

From supplier capability and qualification to process control and quality system audits, there are a wide range of options.

Supply Chain Management – Webinar Review

Our Tampa office worked with the local ASQ section and Hillsborough Community College’s Institute for Corporate and Continuing Education and coordinated and instructed a series of webinars that will run through this month.  The webinar scheduled for today discusses Supply Chain Management, which many in our industry recognize is a broad topic. As a brief introduction, the following components are discussed:

Supplier Selection

  • Conduct a needs analysis (brainstorm and consider long-term growth expectations).
  • Conduct preliminary interviews and/or surveys.
  • Evaluate samples.
  • Perform on-site audits (general quality systems management, ISO based, social responsibility, security, etc.).
  • Use a grid analysis for objective decision making.

Supplier Evaluation (Performance)

Standards: Ensuring Quality, Safety & Spookiness on Halloween

Line-of-pumpkins-from-iStockPhotoHalloween is approaching and is celebrated by millions around the world each year on October 31st.

At Pro QC, our teams across the globe often observe Halloween with good food, friends and festive decorations.

The history of Halloween has evolved.

“Traditional activities on Halloween include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting “haunted houses” and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand.

The activity is popular in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, and due to increased American cultural influence in recent years, trick-or-treating has started to occur among children in many parts of Europe, and in the Saudi Aramco camps of Dhahran, Akaria compounds and Ras Tanura in Saudi Arabia.” (Source)

Amid all of the spooky fun, we often forget to appreciate the standards, specifications and/or other quality efforts that make this holiday safe!  For example:

Who cares about noise?

“One person’s data is another person’s noise.” ~K.C. Cole

Did you know?

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that the single most common irreversible occupational hazard worldwide is noise-induced hearing impairment.
  • Noise levels are commonly measured in decibels (dB). It is a logarithmic scale rather than a linear one, because the human ear can handle such a vast range of sound levels. Zero dB is the softest sound a healthy human ear can detect. 
  • Eighty-five decibels (dB) is the level above which hearing protection is recommended to avoid hearing loss from the cumulative effects of exposure to noise over time. How can you tell if the noise level is 85 dB? Here’s a quick test: If you have to raise your voice to talk to someone who is an arm’s length away from you, you are likely in an environment with a sound level of 85 dB or more.                                                                                                            (Source)

At Pro QC, we care about noise. Our quality engineers perform special testing to ensure that product being produced and sold meets specifications and ultimately customer expectations.